The Songstress, Songbird

Songbird is a 23 year old singer of Haitian American decent. She was born in Brooklyn, NY and raised in Long Island up until the age of 18. She then made her way back to Brooklyn. She’s been singing since the young age of seven and has been following her dreams. Not only is singing her dream, but she is also currently in school pursuing a nursing career. She has already received her LPN license, and has planned to continue on. She believes that one should always have a concrete plan and plan b.

I had the pleasure of interviewing this lovely young lady, who gives off nothing but good vibes. Very positive and all around great person. Below you’ll see more of a glimpse of who she is, her journey thus far, and what’s to come down the road.

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Miss Jones: When did you discover your love and passion for singing?

Songbird: My older cousin is actually the reason I’m singing today. She’s my favorite cousin, and when I was younger, I always wanted to be just like her. One year during our family reunion, my grandmother wanted all of her grandchildren to sing. We all gathered together and sang ‘Can’t Give Up Now, and for some reason I just grabbed the mic. And I loved being in that moment. And I sounded good. That’s when I knew this was something I loved.

Miss Jones: When did you realize you wanted to make this a career?

Songbird: It was in junior high school. I struggled with a speech impediment. I stuttered very badly, and wasn’t able to reiterate some things because I couldn’t speak properly. But when I sang, I didn’t stutter. Singing helped me gain confidence and control of my stuttering. I felt like a totally different person when I sang. It literally changed my life.

Miss Jones: What do you love the most as a singer?

Songbird: I love that I can always switch it up. I don’t always have to be stagnant. I can do R&B, but I can also turn around and do a jazz set. You can also add various live bands. Through all of it, you improve and create art. I can be transparent or a chameleon. It’s a never ending cycle of change.

MJ: What do dislike about it?

SB: When you’re an artist, it’s bittersweet that you put yourself into your art, you give a piece of yourself. I don’t like that people can tear you down or tell you that you’re not doing it right, jus because it’s different and not a trend. I also don’t like the lack of privacy sometimes. Once people are locked in, they assume they get to know every detail. Lastly, I don’t like that some think I should be more sexual, like only sex sells. I have gotten opportunities stripped away because of things I wouldn’t wear. People took songs and studio time away from me because I refused to be something that I’m not. But my artistry and my love for this keeps me going.

MJ: What are some of the mistakes you’ve made during this process?

SB: I’ve been a bit naive in the past and believed everyone had my best interest at heart. I had to learn to let people prove things to me. I’ve also been so quick to jump into things, not knowing much about the business. I had to learn that it’s important to have my manager alongside of me. I can’t do things on my own. It’s so much better when I have my team. People respect you more when you do.

MJ: What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

SB: It’s not tangible yet. So far, believing in myself and having confidence in myself. It hasn’t always been this way. I was going to give up at one point because of people. I’m now in a place where I can love my life for me, and I’m not letting anyone else tear that away from me. My biggest accomplishment is restoring my faith in God, and my inner growth.

MJ: What do you hope to gain?

SB: There are different levels. On the level of an artist, I want more freedom to write and create. I’m still a little afraid at times and it takes me a while to get inspired. So I hope to gain that freedom as an artist. I also hope that I can become a bridge that can connect people. Music is where complete strangers can bond. I want to become an artist that can help bridge people together. I want to be another source of music that can create a sense of ease, to the emotions of others. Even if it’s just one person, I can inspire others and keep the circle going.

MJ: Who were your inspirations?

SB: Musically, Chrisette Michele, Lauryn Hill, and Erykah Badu, who I’ve had the pleasure of being in the presence of. Her spirit is so lively. As she walks in a room, you can just feel it. She’s so humble, positive, and full of life. So free. Generally, when it comes to artistry and reaching your full potential, I would say Beyoncé. She performs effortlessly and has produced great growth. Lastly, in the health profession, I would say my aunt. I’d like to follow in her footsteps. As a nurse and as a person. She has changed the lives of everyone she’s encountered.

MJ: What is some advice you’d give to someone who’d like to pursue your same career path?

SB: Be ready. Be ready for the roller coaster ride. It’s not a degree or a trade. You live and breath this daily. This is something I didn’t realize when I started. It’s an everyday thing. Someone once said to me, “how can people say you’re singing if you dont devote yourself to doing something towards your career everyday?” If you’re going to do it, understand that it’s a lifelong journey. It’s like my change jar, I would put something in to it everyday. Also, be yourself. For real, for real. So many people want to emulate someone else. Just be yourself.

MJ: Have you thought about motivational speaking at all?

SB: With the program that I’m involved in, the Scholarich Music Group, all of the artists are expected to. We set out to make education more appealing through music, clothing, and art. We help young people write music and go into the studio. I’m trying to now branch out and start my own girls group. I want to ultimately intertwine health and music. We have total control of pro creation. If we reach kids at a certain age, we can create change and hold them responsible. I always feel the need to give back. Teaching young ladies with class, and show them that it’s a different way to come off. It doesn’t always have to be revealing to be appealing. Letting them know it’s ok to be different.

MJ: What can we look forward to from you?

SB: My single, The Break Up Song will release February 26th. My EP, Sweet and Sour will also be released this year in April. It’s all about the sweet and sour of life, the good and bad of everything.

It was great to talk to an intelligent young lady who knows exactly what she wants and has accepted her process; and used it as a way to continue to pursue her goals and dreams. Songbird will be one of the performers at Tha L. Spot’s 3rd year anniversary concert at the Roulette Theatre in Brooklyn, NY. Be sure to check it out.
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To stay up to date with Songbird, be sure to connect with her through her networks. Twitter and Instagram: @sheissongbird. And also visit, scholarich.com/songbird.

Charlie Wilson: Comedian, Host, Producer

Comedian and host, Charlie Wilson, was born and raised in Shreveport, Louisiana. He was always involved in acting, drama, and public speaking at school and in church. He attended LSU, while working two jobs. At some point during his life, he moved to Dallas, Texas with his high school sweetheart. While he was there, he auditioned for various stage plays and continued down the path or arts and entertainment. After two years of acting in these plays, one day he was joking around on stage and was asked has he ever considered comedy. He never thought about it up it to that point. This was the start of his pursuit as a comedian.

After many years of being together, Charlie and his high school sweetheart had given birth to a little girl (who was born with sickle cell). Shortly after, Charlie decided it was time to get married and make a full commitment to his family at the age of 23. Two weeks after they wed, their daughter passed away. This was a very difficult period in both of their lives, and they responded differently to this unfortunate circumstance. While she moved closer towards God, Charlie moved forward with things in a negative capacity. One day his wife decided she wanted a fresh start and thought it would be a good idea to move to New York. Charlie however, didn’t think that would be a good move for him. He felt that he was too much into his career and also a cars salesman. So he told her to leave if that’s what she wanted to do. After being without her for several months, Charlie had time to think. Before they decided to divorce and put their whole marriage to rest, he wanted a fresh start. He moved to New York with her. And they built together. They struggled while living in NYC, but they were able to overcome. They are still married and now have another daughter, who is two years old.

A month after being in NY, Wilson did an open mic and that was the start of his new journey. He was then told by the manager of the establishment that he did well and could do a one man show. One night after a show, one of the audience members wanted to talk to him about a talk show. He shot a pilot for a daytime show. This is where Charlie Wilson TV originated. The woman in charge of the daytime show passed six months ago. However Wilson kept the name as he continues to pursue his career. He’s had many accomplishments, such as: opening up for various people, Shaq’s All Star Comedy show, starting his online show, as well as hosting many showcases. Although the journey wasn’t all easy, Wilson has embraced his process, continuing on.

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I had the pleasure of interviewing Charlie Wilson. He kept me laughing all the while sharing his life and his journey. Below are a few highlights of the interview.

Miss Jones: How long have you been in this industry?

Charlie Wilson: I’ve been doing this for about four years now.

Miss Jones: Where does your material generally come from?

Charlie Wilson: It comes from life experiences, and I turn it around into something funny. I make it relatable according to the scenery.

MJ: What were some of the mistakes you made in this business?

CW: I would say, moving a little too fast. I was trying to produce shows and my budget was a little too much I know there’s money to be made, but not initially. Ultimately, my mistakes were losing my focus and moving too fast.

MJ: What were your biggest struggles?

CW: Trying to get people to know who I was. I know I have the talent and ability, but in NYC trying to build your name, it can become a little difficult. Trying to have a crowd and an audience is tough. Instagram and Twitter is one thing, but having people show up is different. Trying to build a loyal following is hard, but you can’t let that slow you down. You have to stay focused and consistent. And act like its a full house every time.

MJ: What was your biggest accomplishment?

CW: my first national TV appearance in the Wendy Williams show, a year ago. Someone reached out to me and let me know about the street talk segment and I was able to be apart. It was great because my family who can’t see me often was able to see what I’m doing. It showed that I’m not just talking about it, but I’m actually doing it.

MJ: What do you hope to gain?

CW: I want to have a platform doing what I love to do. I was to be able to inspire others through this as well through the power of influence. I want to be able to build for myself, then step into a middle school and encourage and empower this next generation.

MJ: What advice would you give to others?

CW: really find out if this is what you want. Always stay focused and embrace your process. It’s easier to accomplish things when you don’t allow the low moments to overtake you. Many people want to do this because it’s a trend, but are you really willing to sacrifice and go without.

Be sure to check Charlie Wilson out as he hosts Tha L. Spot’s 3 Year anniversary at Roulette Thearter in Brooklyn, Thursday March 12th.

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To stay up to date with this funny guy, check out his networks. Instagram and Twitter @charliewilsontv and visit his website, charliewilsontv.com! You can also check him every Wednesday night from 9-11pm on his radio show, streaming live on 15moferadio.com. He’s in the move and has many events coming up soon!

Author of Preseason Love, Ahyiana Angel

Preseason Love is a novel that encompasses the life of today’s female. I haven’t read a novel straight through in quite a while, but I found myself up at 3am trying to see what happens next. It’s a story about a young publicist, who left her life in California for New York. Scottie left her old life to start over fresh. She surely did just that, new job, new love, and new drama. This story of career driven women, friendships, relationships and all that comes with it, was amazingly written leaving you wanting more.

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(Photo retrieved from Ahyiana Angel)

I had the pleasure of interviewing the lovely Ahyiana Angel, author of Preseason Love. Our conversation was one of the best I’ve had, so easy to talk to and her personality shined bright. Below you’ll find out more about Ahyiana, her transition from NBA Publicist to author, her progress, and Preseason Love.

Miss Jones: For those who don’t know, tell the readers a little bit about yourself.

Ahyiana Angel: I started off in PR. I never intended to be a writer, however, I adored writing because it’s needed in the publicist field. I had a thought about the novel and played with the idea. But I put it on the back burner. I then realized I needed a career change. I started designing jewelry, but I needed something new. So I started the novel. Nine months while I was working as a publicist, I worked on It. I didn’t know anyone who published a book traditionally, so the whole journey was new for me. I didn’t go to school for any of this, but I still did it.

Miss Jones: When did you start the book?

Ahyiana Angel: In 2007 I had the idea. It wasn’t until 2012 that I started the first chapter and sat on it. 2013 was when I got really serious and started researching.

MJ: How did you go about publishing your book?

AA: I did my research first. I knew I wanted to be traditionally published. After I did all of the research, I found out about self publishing. I found company names and knew I needed an agent. Putting a book out is much like putting out music. You have to have a finished product to present. So I had my completed manuscript and took it to an agent. He loved it; but the only problem was, he couldn’t take it to an editor as it was. I thought publishing companies did the editing. That was a wake up call for me, I realized it wasn’t ready.
One day a friend of mine told me about a writers bootcamp in Maryland (it’s important to tell people about what you’re doing.). Sitting at the finals in Miami, I realized I didn’t want to be there. Then I said to myself, “If you’re going do it, you have to do it. Try all avenues to get to where you want to be.” So I decided to go. There were fifty people at the bootcamp. Zane was also there, as well as her publishing director. They gave those in attendance an opportunity to submit their story, but I knew I wasn’t ready. When I finished, I had it edited and sent a query letter with my full manuscript. I made sure I was prepared this time. She then offered to publish my book.

MJ: What were a few steps you had to take to get where you are today?

AA: I figured out my storyline. It sounds simple, but it’s the most important. It’s a lot to write a book. Having the material is most important. When I didn’t feel like writing, I did my research, from publishing companies to finding out everything about the industry. Almost completing the manuscript, I shopped around before signing a deal. I then started promoting to build my name as a writer. I also started by blog, Life According to Her before the book came out as well as writing for other publications. Promotion and marketing was all me. I had to be ready to hustle and move my product. It’s the publishing company’s job to put the book on the shelf, and my job to get them off the shelves. My PR background was able to help me through the marketing phase.

MJ: What was the deciding factor to shifting careers?

AA: I would say the lack of desire for where I was. I was a publicist for the NBA for 6 years. It seems fun to everyone, but it has its ups and downs with the policies and long nights. Many people in the field have transitioned. Being all in as a publicist, you get tired of being on for other people. I started to feel stifled creatively. I loved jewelry and tried jewelry designing. But I felt like there was more. I felt that if I didn’t do something, I’d get stuck. And I didn’t want to lose myself. I wasn’t excited where I was.
When I talk to college students, I always say, “find an avenue that works for you. Pay attention to what interests you, what comes natural, and is effortless.” I was blessed to be able to find the avenue that works for me.

MJ: Would you consider yourself to be a motivational speaker or mentor?

AA: I wouldn’t say that I’m a motivational speaker, but I am a motivator by nature. I like to help and push people in the right direction. I also mentor college students I’ve met through programs I’ve spoken at.

MJ: Did you have a mentor to help you through the process?

AA: No, didn’t have one. I was raised to be independent and know how to seek out information. There was no one consistent person to fulfill that role, but I knew how to push myself.

MJ: Ok, let’s talk Preseason Love. I loved the book! I was up all night reading. I have a few novels in the house and haven’t been able to get through them, but I was able to with this one.

AA: I’m so happy you did. I just wanted to tell a story. I’m glad that people are reading and enjoying it. I was confident in the book, but once it’s out there you get a little nervous. I’ve heard Lauryn Hill say, “I’m an artist and I’m sensitive about my….” I understood her statement more after I wrote this book. (Laughs)

MJ: What inspired the book? Was it your life?

AA: Fiction comes from some idea. The idea was from my reality or someone else’s reality. I never wanted to write an autobiography. I wanted creative rhythm and to keep people guessing.

MJ: Is there going to be a sequel?

AA: Yes there will be. I’m currently working on it. When you rely on yourself for promotion and making sure you book sells, it’s hard to put out another. However, I have the outline so it’s all about completing it.

MJ: What will we find in this one?

AA: Scottie did the right thing by facing her past with Ivan. Going towards it head on, shows the growth in her. New York changed her. Part two, we will see her humble herself more. She didn’t appreciate all that she had, but all of that taught her. We’ll be pleased how she comes into her own and handles herself.

MJ: What do you hope to accomplish through your books and your writing?

AA: It’s twofold. In real life, I’d like to show my family members and women in general, that when you put your mind to something, you can do it. You’re limitless. I want them to see that transition is not impossible, I’ve done it. No one pulled me up, I had faith and was confident in who I was. I took classes and sought out information that I needed. This is a competitive field and I wanted to be the best. I didn’t want to set myself up. I’m not great, but I want to be a source of inspiration and change.
Within the book, I want women to see that they’re not alone. We all go through this. Maybe we didn’t, but someone else went through it. Black women are used to being groomed to be strong and provide, that we can’t open ourselves to be vulnerable. And this is what the book is all about.
In college I read a lot of urban books, and I was tired of the same storyline. When I got older, I realized that wasn’t my life or reality. There are women who have a career and are driven, but still enjoys her life with her friends.

MJ: What advice would you give someone who wishes to be an author like yourself?

AA: Do your research. You may not know what you’re getting yourself into. It’s a lot of work and research to know so that you can always be prepared. You should have an idea of what’s expected, so when you have the opportunity, you’ll be ready.
Keep writing to see if you want to stick with it.
You have to network and get to know people.
Tell people about what you’re trying to do. I’m not saying go broadcast it to everyone, but let those key people in your life know so that they can put you on to things.
Always pay attention.
Lastly, create a platform outside of a publisher. Figure out your name and what works best for you.

MJ: What’s the most fulfilling thing about being an author?

AA: Actually seeing your work and idea come together. Seeing the first book, was like wow it’s really a reality. Also, seeing people read and enjoy it. Hearing people say they loved it shows that your hard work, time, and ideas were all worth it.

MJ: What were/are your biggest struggles?

AA: Through the process, starting was the biggest struggle. Trying to keep myself on track was a little difficult. It was the springtime when I started and I wanted to be out and about. But I had to discipline myself. Now I would say my biggest struggle is putting myself out there. As much personality as I have, I’m still a little hesitant to put myself out there. To share yourself with others is a little nerve wrecking. As a publicist for the NBA, you would never say who you were. It was just something you didn’t do. But now I have to push myself as a writer.

Ahyiana has toured the U.S promoting her newly released book and showing the world who she is. Check out more of Ahyiana Angel by visiting her networks. Website: http://www.ahyianaangel.com. Blog: lifeaccordingtoher.com. Twitter/Instagram: @ahyiana_angel.
Preseason Love is available for purchase at Barnes and Noble, Walmart, amazon.com, and more. I’m telling you from experience, you’re going to want to get your hands on this one!

The Coaching Cupid: Dhylles Davis

After meeting and hearing part of Dhylles Davis’ story as an overcomer at an event a few months ago, I was able to sit and talk with her about her book, her life, and her journey.

Dhylles is a life coach, motivational speaker, and author of ‘Your Life! Your Purpose! No Explanation!’ Her book is not your ordinary self-help book. It is a book that not only causes you to think and make changes in your life, but also shares personal experiences within every chapter.

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Below you will find some of the highlights from the face to face interview with Dhylles Davis herself.

Miss Jones: At what point did you make the decision to become a life coach?

Dhylles Davis: It was at the age of 32 that I realized I needed to find myself. I had gone through many trials, from being sexually abused from 7-14 to having battles with death. This is when I realized I needed to share my story and help others as well.

Miss Jones : What were some of the steps you had to take to get where you are today?

Dhylles Davis: I had to be honest about my truth, embrace who I was, and forgive. I had to forgive the person in my life that molested me, as well as my mother.

MJ: You speak a lot about the importance of having a relationship with yourself in your book. How did you get to that place?

DD: I didn’t always have a great relationship with myself. I couldn’t be alone with myself. It was something that I had to practice. I had to look at myself in the mirror until I was comfortable with who I saw. I also had to take myself out on dates.

MJ: What were some of your fears during this process?

DD : My greatest fears were being honest in my book, confrontation with others, and learning how to say no.

MJ: What were some of the biggest things you’ve overcome during this process?

DD: The conversation I had to have with my mom after the book was written was one of the things I had to overcome. Because of the transparency in the book, she didn’t like everything I decided to include.
Then having the conversation with my family, helping them to understand that this is something I needed to do. I had to face my truth and share it with others.
And through all of this, I had to find my own voice.

MJ: After putting out so much into other people through your coaching and motivational speaking, how do regain your strength?

DD: Sometimes it can be overwhelming to pour out so much. I had to go on hiatus for a couple of months, where I took a step back from everything. I also have a wonderful husband who’s always there for me. We have created a beautiful space within our home, where I can have a clear mind and breath. Lastly, my positive outlook on life always keeps me lifted.

MJ: Speaking of your husband, when we first met, I instantly saw how supportive he was of you. How has having him by your side been helpful to you and your progress?

DD: My husband has been amazing. The love we have for each other is incredible. He’s been tremendously supportive of me in every way possible. We can literally talk about anything. We keep communication at the top of our list, and I believe that is what sustained us all of these years. We’ve been together for seven years, and married for three. We’ve been through so much throughout that time. I’ve had three miscarriages, a still born, three DNC’s, and got very sick afterwards. I almost died because my fibroids were infected, and I had to have them removed. Three weeks later, I had to have my gall bladder removed as well. This was two weeks before my wedding. I told the doctors I had to still be able to fit into my wedding dress. My husband said he was marrying me the date of our scheduled wedding, no matter what.
There was really no time for me to fully process all that I had gone through until after the wedding. A week later is when I just broke down. Sitting in the living room, I just sat and cried. And my husband sat there right beside me.

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MJ : What were some of your biggest struggles throughout the duration?

DD: Marketing and promotions of the book were one of my biggest struggles. Repeating and sharing my affirmations, along with my story. Also, being dedicated was a struggle of mine. Being able to complete my book without offending people. And lastly the conversation I had to have with my mother concerning the book. It was a struggle because she is still my mother, however, I had to let her know that I couldn’t be a walking contradiction I had to first clean out my own closet before I was able to help someone else with theirs.

MJ: What’s the most fulfilling thing about what you do?

DD: I have to say the most fulfilling thing about my job as a life coach is when I hear someone say, “I didn’t know that was my purpose.” Or ” I didn’t think about it like that. You’ve really helped me.”

MJ: How would you encourage someone else who’s going down the same path that you had to go down?

DD: I would tell them not to be afraid to open up, be fearless. You never know who you’re inspiring.

MJ: What do you ultimately wish to accomplish?

DD: Peace, purpose, and happiness. At the end of the day, this is what everyone is seeking. I’d like to touch lives and help others accomplish this as well.

MJ: What are your favorite motivational phrases?

DD: I have two. The first is a quote by Mahatma Ghandi, which says, ‘Each night, when I go to sleep, I die. And the next morning, when I wake up, I am reborn.” And the second is, opportunities are new everyday.

MJ: Is there anything else you would like to leave with the readers?

DD: Love life and live it. Don’t live in the past. Be fearless and take leaps of faith and positive risks. Remember, through vulnerability comes strength. Acknowledge necessary change. And crawl before you walk.

Stay up to date and for consultations with the coaching Cupid, Dhylles Davis by visiting her networks. Website: Dhyllesdavis.com. Blog: http://www.startlivingstopexisting.com. Instagram/Twitter: @thecoachingcupid.

Also, visit her website and purchase her book ‘Your Life! Your Purpose! no Explanations!’ I’m telling you, you won’t be disappointed. This book has personally pushed me to think and reconsider some of the things in my own life. It’s encouraging and inspiring to say the least.

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Beauty Within TV

Last week, I had the opportunity to sit and talk with Anissa Rochester, CEO of Beauty Within TV. We decided to meet during fashion week so she could not only tell me about herself and BWTV, but to fill us in on Fashion Week. Our meeting place was at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square.

I started the interview with getting a better feel of who Anissa is. She has been in the entertainment industry for years. Since the age of 19, she’s been a fit model, actress and toured as a dancer. So she’s no stranger to the field of entertainment. Anissa graduated from LIU with a degree in media arts. When she decided to pursue her love for acting and dancing, she received a scholarship to NYU’s theatre program. When Anissa found out she was pregnant, she decided to go another route. Somewhere down the line, she mixed her knowledge of beauty and fashion with her media skills and created Beauty Within TV.

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Anissa Rochester

Here’s a deeper glimpse of the interview:

Miss Jones: How would you describe BWTV for readers that may not know?

Anissa Rochester: Beauty Within is an outlet to inspire women, ages 18-30, to believe and fulfill their dreams. I’m passionate about helping others to pursue their dreams and finding their inner beauty. BWTV started out as a television program on public access, where we interviewed many celebrities. Ranging from Kerri Washington, Kim Kardashian, Tina Fey, Miguel, R. Kelly, Sherri Shepherd, Iman, and several others. BWTV also had the opportunity to cover red carpet events, including the TLC Story and The Best Man Holiday. About two years ago we relaunched with an entertainment website.

MJ: What was one of your most memorable interviews?

AR: I would say that my interview with Iman was the most memorable and inspiring. She was so nice and classy. She treated us with respect being a small unrecognizable name. There are many celebrities who don’t take the time to support your passion. However, she was the complete opposite. Iman was very welcoming as well as professional.

MJ: How have you applied your passion for helping others rediscover their inner beauty as well as fulfill their dreams?

AR: In my experience of business and fashion, I’ve done a few workshops in schools for young girls. We split them up in different groups and gave them their own fashion houses and taught them about the business of fashion, rather than just the model aspect. There’s more behind a pretty face. All the groups were given the task of creating a name and an idea for a logo. After that was done, each of them were assigned a specific task. For example, one of the girls may have been a stylist, while another was on the financial end. They were given paper dolls and asked to design different things. Then they had to write a proposal showing how they planned to be successful based on their ideas.

MJ: What grade/age group did you work with?

AR: This particular session was with 4-6th graders. I also did another program with 12th graders on their way to college, it was the Beauty Within mentoring program. We came at the very end of the year, they’d all been gotten accepted into college. We partnered with another organization that prepared them for school. My segment was to do makeovers, and we posed the question “what makes you beauty within?” We also asked what motivates and inspires them. I was very surprised by the answers I received.

As we continued on with this topic of mentoring, I saw this as a great opportunity for these girls at such a young age. I’m sure it will most definitely lead them down the right path. Anissa plans to continue to do more hands on activities and projects with young people as soon as the next phase of BWTV has launched.

MJ: What’s next for BWTV?

AR: BWTV will be launching a magazine in October. It will be another outlet to deliver what we cover on the site. With something tangible, it’ll be a faster way to reach and build our audience.  We will have fashion content, as well as various celebrity interviews. On the cover of our first issue will be Fifth Harmony, an all girls group that started on XFactor.

MJ: What are some of the struggles you had to face in this industry?

AR: One of my biggest struggles were finances and funding. As entrepreneurs starting out, we just don’t have the money. Which can lead to frustration. I’m still an artist, so as artists, we get frustrated easily because we want to live our passion. I didn’t just want to work at any mediocre job. Even if it was a job on wall street, I didn’t necessarily want to do it because it wasn’t my passion. But I had to work jobs that I didn’t want to work in order to make money and still do this at the same time. Funding is very difficult. But you have to have perseverance and resilience. I could’ve quit a long time ago when we were just a program on public access. I had camera guys not show up for interviews and hosts that would argue with me and not show up. I didn’t have much money and most of them were working for free. Working on a zero budget, everything came out polished. Even my team now is comprised of interns who only receive a stipend or credit for school. It’s been a struggle, but when people see my work, they know it’s polished. My work speaks for itself, therefore people believe in it. This also shows my leadership skills, to have as many people as I’ve had work with me with no budget says a lot.

MJ: What are some of the results you began to see thus far?

AR: I would say completion and growth. To see how far I’ve come, close to completing and accomplishing my goal is the most fulfilling thing. The connections that I’ve made are also great results. It’s all about who you know. I’ve learned not to burn bridges. My network is my net-worth.

MJ: What would you say your ultimate accomplishment would be?

AR: My ultimate accomplishment would be for BWTV to be known nationally/worldwide. I hope to gain more finances to expand my company, build my team and create jobs. I ultimately want to grow.

MJ: What advice would you give a young person that desires to go down the same path as you?

AR: I would tell them to make sure they have a great support system to surround and encourage them. If finances are an issue, don’t let that stop them. Continue to pursue your dream. Also sit back and reflect, make sure this is really what you want. And don’t be afraid to try different things until you find exactly what fits you.

MJ: So let’s talk Fashion Week

AR: I thoroughly enjoyed this week. I attended many shows, but the Michael Castillo show was my favorite. David Tlale’s show made me feel like I belonged with the African rituals. However, Castillo’s designs were amazing. My favorites were the long gowns.

Lovely Miss Jones is just as passionate about helping others, so I commend Anissa and BWTV for the work that she is putting forth and look forward to working with her soon. To stay up to date on the upcoming magazine as well as other exciting ventures coming from BWTV, visit the website, beautywithintv.com and follow on instagram @beautywithintv. You won’t be disappointed!

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Miss Jones & Anissa Rochester