The Songstress, Songbird

Songbird is a 23 year old singer of Haitian American decent. She was born in Brooklyn, NY and raised in Long Island up until the age of 18. She then made her way back to Brooklyn. She’s been singing since the young age of seven and has been following her dreams. Not only is singing her dream, but she is also currently in school pursuing a nursing career. She has already received her LPN license, and has planned to continue on. She believes that one should always have a concrete plan and plan b.

I had the pleasure of interviewing this lovely young lady, who gives off nothing but good vibes. Very positive and all around great person. Below you’ll see more of a glimpse of who she is, her journey thus far, and what’s to come down the road.

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Miss Jones: When did you discover your love and passion for singing?

Songbird: My older cousin is actually the reason I’m singing today. She’s my favorite cousin, and when I was younger, I always wanted to be just like her. One year during our family reunion, my grandmother wanted all of her grandchildren to sing. We all gathered together and sang ‘Can’t Give Up Now, and for some reason I just grabbed the mic. And I loved being in that moment. And I sounded good. That’s when I knew this was something I loved.

Miss Jones: When did you realize you wanted to make this a career?

Songbird: It was in junior high school. I struggled with a speech impediment. I stuttered very badly, and wasn’t able to reiterate some things because I couldn’t speak properly. But when I sang, I didn’t stutter. Singing helped me gain confidence and control of my stuttering. I felt like a totally different person when I sang. It literally changed my life.

Miss Jones: What do you love the most as a singer?

Songbird: I love that I can always switch it up. I don’t always have to be stagnant. I can do R&B, but I can also turn around and do a jazz set. You can also add various live bands. Through all of it, you improve and create art. I can be transparent or a chameleon. It’s a never ending cycle of change.

MJ: What do dislike about it?

SB: When you’re an artist, it’s bittersweet that you put yourself into your art, you give a piece of yourself. I don’t like that people can tear you down or tell you that you’re not doing it right, jus because it’s different and not a trend. I also don’t like the lack of privacy sometimes. Once people are locked in, they assume they get to know every detail. Lastly, I don’t like that some think I should be more sexual, like only sex sells. I have gotten opportunities stripped away because of things I wouldn’t wear. People took songs and studio time away from me because I refused to be something that I’m not. But my artistry and my love for this keeps me going.

MJ: What are some of the mistakes you’ve made during this process?

SB: I’ve been a bit naive in the past and believed everyone had my best interest at heart. I had to learn to let people prove things to me. I’ve also been so quick to jump into things, not knowing much about the business. I had to learn that it’s important to have my manager alongside of me. I can’t do things on my own. It’s so much better when I have my team. People respect you more when you do.

MJ: What has been your biggest accomplishment so far?

SB: It’s not tangible yet. So far, believing in myself and having confidence in myself. It hasn’t always been this way. I was going to give up at one point because of people. I’m now in a place where I can love my life for me, and I’m not letting anyone else tear that away from me. My biggest accomplishment is restoring my faith in God, and my inner growth.

MJ: What do you hope to gain?

SB: There are different levels. On the level of an artist, I want more freedom to write and create. I’m still a little afraid at times and it takes me a while to get inspired. So I hope to gain that freedom as an artist. I also hope that I can become a bridge that can connect people. Music is where complete strangers can bond. I want to become an artist that can help bridge people together. I want to be another source of music that can create a sense of ease, to the emotions of others. Even if it’s just one person, I can inspire others and keep the circle going.

MJ: Who were your inspirations?

SB: Musically, Chrisette Michele, Lauryn Hill, and Erykah Badu, who I’ve had the pleasure of being in the presence of. Her spirit is so lively. As she walks in a room, you can just feel it. She’s so humble, positive, and full of life. So free. Generally, when it comes to artistry and reaching your full potential, I would say Beyoncé. She performs effortlessly and has produced great growth. Lastly, in the health profession, I would say my aunt. I’d like to follow in her footsteps. As a nurse and as a person. She has changed the lives of everyone she’s encountered.

MJ: What is some advice you’d give to someone who’d like to pursue your same career path?

SB: Be ready. Be ready for the roller coaster ride. It’s not a degree or a trade. You live and breath this daily. This is something I didn’t realize when I started. It’s an everyday thing. Someone once said to me, “how can people say you’re singing if you dont devote yourself to doing something towards your career everyday?” If you’re going to do it, understand that it’s a lifelong journey. It’s like my change jar, I would put something in to it everyday. Also, be yourself. For real, for real. So many people want to emulate someone else. Just be yourself.

MJ: Have you thought about motivational speaking at all?

SB: With the program that I’m involved in, the Scholarich Music Group, all of the artists are expected to. We set out to make education more appealing through music, clothing, and art. We help young people write music and go into the studio. I’m trying to now branch out and start my own girls group. I want to ultimately intertwine health and music. We have total control of pro creation. If we reach kids at a certain age, we can create change and hold them responsible. I always feel the need to give back. Teaching young ladies with class, and show them that it’s a different way to come off. It doesn’t always have to be revealing to be appealing. Letting them know it’s ok to be different.

MJ: What can we look forward to from you?

SB: My single, The Break Up Song will release February 26th. My EP, Sweet and Sour will also be released this year in April. It’s all about the sweet and sour of life, the good and bad of everything.

It was great to talk to an intelligent young lady who knows exactly what she wants and has accepted her process; and used it as a way to continue to pursue her goals and dreams. Songbird will be one of the performers at Tha L. Spot’s 3rd year anniversary concert at the Roulette Theatre in Brooklyn, NY. Be sure to check it out.
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To stay up to date with Songbird, be sure to connect with her through her networks. Twitter and Instagram: @sheissongbird. And also visit, scholarich.com/songbird.

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